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Assessing CREST Bronze

A teacher or technician in school/college or a home educator can assess CREST Bronze Awards. Ideally, the assessor shouldn’t be the same person who has been facilitating the CREST projects. To complete the assessment, they will need:

  • The project work
    • the Bronze workbook or
    • project report and student profile
  • The assessment criteria
  • Student details (age, disability, special circumstances etc.)

The aim of assessment at Bronze level is:

  • To confirm that all students contributed at least 10 hours work
  • To confirm that the subject knowledge/skill level is appropriate for the age or ability of the student
  • To confirm that the student(s) did the work themselves
  • To assess the project against the CREST criteria

How to assess

1. Start by reviewing the materials produced by the students. assess the students’ work against each of the assessment criteria, taking age and special circumstances into account.

2. Discuss the project with the student, focussing on areas where you would need more evidence for the CREST criteria. During the discussion, confirm the level and length of the work and that the project was completed by the student(s).

Possible actions are:

Achievement level Action
11+ out of 15 criteria met Award Bronze
5/6 weak areas Request further information or work from the student
6+ weak areas Consider not awarding
Many criteria met at an advanced level of scientific knowledge, and student spent 30+ hours on the project Consider submitting for Silver Award

3. The results of the assessment should then be added to the project on your CREST account.

thumb_03_60_60Chris Conheeny

Tapton School

My Stem Club were assessed for their Bronze Award and had so much pride when they got it! The assessor was impressed at the skills they had learned in communication and facing challenges. The whole experience is so valuable!

thumb_03_60_60CREST teacher

It’s helped the self-esteem for some low achievers for whom it is their major achievement in school.